Understanding Frank Lloyd Wright Design Style

When asked to name famous architects, Frank Lloyd Wright may come to mind. He was known as one of the most influential architects of the 20th century. By experimenting with different layouts and materials, he created innovative home building ideas that were ahead of this time. In fact, many of his ideas are being used today to create modern homes that transcend style and offer a uniqueness that many of today’s homes fail to offer homeowners.

The Frank Lloyd Wright Design Style
The style is built upon the premise of making each home vastly different from the other. No two homes were ever the same. In fact, each home was uniquely created to fit in with the makeup of the land. So homes in California were different from ones in the East. Frank Lloyd Wright’s philosophy was to create from the earth.  His approach to building led to homes that were more open and fluid, rather than constrained and claustrophobic in nature.

Characteristics of the Prairie Style Home
Frank Lloyd Wright grew up in the Midwest, so the homes he created were typically based on the prairie style home. His goal was to emphasize the natural beauty of the prairie as well as combine beauty and functionality. Therefore, the Frank Lloyd Wright design style includes a variety of unique features and styles, including roofs that are gently sloped, heavy-set chimneys, low terraces, quiet sky lines and out-reaching walls. Frank Lloyd Wright’s prairie homes are built horizontally and on the outside include long lines of windows, hip roofs with low pitches, wide eaves and brick or wood veneers. Inside is an open home plan that offers a central fireplace and furniture, sometimes even built into the home itself.  The windows are made of art glass and work as light screens. The materials used to build the home were all-natural.

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