Advantages Of A Ductless Split Cooling System

Air conditioning works on a relatively simple basis. As per Energy Quest, using the same concepts of thermodynamics as your average refrigerator, an air conditioner runs indoor air through its cooling system and pushes hot air out through the back, into the outdoors. This way, warmth is taken from the indoors of a home and sent back out into the summer heat.

It’s the  perfect way to keep a large place like a living room cool in times of dire heat. However, it’s also extremely expensive to keep a regular old air conditioning unit running.

Why Traditional Air Conditioning Is Too Costly
Typical window-mounted units utilize a lot of energy to continuously keep your home cool, which is why modern technology revised air conditioning recently and came up with the ductless cooling system. While the first air conditioner was a thing of the 30s, ductless split systems came about in the 70s.

Split systems separate the evaporative and condensing units, so the heat exchange process takes place through hoses that allow the cooling unit to take up little space indoors while the condenser stays outside, perhaps on the roof.

Why You Need a Ductless Cooling System
A ductless cooling system is better in a number of ways. For one, it’s much easier to install, and repair. There’s less of a hassle in removing the unit from a wall or window. Secondly, ductless units are far more energy efficient, saving you a great deal of energy. Through a single system, you can cool different parts of your home with various cooling units, and remotely control the cooling through an electronic system.

So all in all, it’s convenient, more environmentally-friendly, much less noisy, and the overall superior choice to traditional cooling. There is one downside as per Energy.gov – and that’s cost. If installed wrongly or used improperly, a ductless system can cost you a whole lot of money, which is why it pays to contact an experienced HVAC company, says Worlock Heat and AC.

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